The sentence in which the verb has a direct object is “I need to go.” In this sentence, the verb is “to go.” The direct object in this instance would be “I”.

In this sentence, the verb is not present. The indirect object may or may not have an article before it depending on your definition of what constitutes a noun phrase. If you consider articles as being part of verbs – such that “‘the'”, for example, becomes “‘to” and “-ing”

less is more, quote, white @ Pixabay

Then there are two possible sentences: Either (A) I am talking about something when I say that I want to work hard ‘in order to do my best, or (B) sometimes people insist they’re happy even when they’re not.

I am talking about something when I say that I want to work hard ‘in order to do my best, or sometimes people insist they’re happy even when they’re not.”

The sentence in which the verb has a direct object is “sometimes people insist they’re happy even when they’re not.”” In this sentence, the verb is “to be”.

Indirect objects are difficult because there may or may not be an article before them depending on your definition of what constitutes a noun phrase. If you consider articles as being part of verbs – such that “‘the'”, for example, becomes “‘to” and “-ing”‘ – then there are two possible sentences: either (A) she said she was going to…

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here